Stop Sign Tickets Lawyer in NY

In New York obeying stop signs is not just a matter of safety but also of legal importance. Violations related to disregarding these signs fall under NY codes such as VTL 1172(a), which mandates a full stop at such traffic devices. With the city's dense traffic landscape, any infraction can easily lead to a stop sign ticket. For those finding themselves ensnared in this legal complication, James Medows emerges as a beacon of hope.


As an adept traffic ticket lawyer, Medows specializes in navigating NY's intricate traffic regulations. He offers invaluable counsel and representation for drivers who've received stop sign tickets, ensuring they are aware of their rights and providing a formidable defense in the city's traffic courts. His expertise has been instrumental for many seeking clarity and fairness amidst NY's rigorous traffic enforcement.

In New York obeying stop signs is not just a matter of safety but also of legal importance. Violations related to disregarding these signs fall under NY codes such as VTL 1172(a), which mandates a full stop at such traffic devices. With the city's dense traffic landscape, any infraction can easily lead to a stop sign ticket. For those finding themselves ensnared in this legal complication, James Medows emerges as a beacon of hope.


As an adept traffic ticket lawyer, Medows specializes in navigating NY's intricate traffic regulations. He offers invaluable counsel and representation for drivers who've received stop sign tickets, ensuring they are aware of their rights and providing a formidable defense in the city's traffic courts. His expertise has been instrumental for many seeking clarity and fairness amidst NY's rigorous traffic enforcement.

How do you normally get stop sign tickets in New York?

In New York, stop sign tickets are commonly issued for violations of Section 1172(a) of the New York Vehicle and Traffic Law, which mandates that every driver must come to a complete stop at a stop sign. Here are the typical scenarios in which a motorist might receive a stop sign ticket:

  • Failing to Stop Completely: The most common reason is simply not coming to a complete stop. A "rolling stop" or "California stop" where the vehicle slows down but doesn't fully stop is still a violation.
  • Stopping Past the Line: If there's a clearly marked stop line at the intersection, drivers must stop before crossing it. Stopping past the line or in the crosswalk can result in a ticket.
  • Failing to Yield: Even after stopping, drivers must yield the right-of-way to other vehicles or pedestrians. If a driver stops but then proceeds when it's not their turn, they can receive a ticket.
  • Obstructed View: If a driver stops but then moves past the sign because their view is obstructed (by bushes, trees, or other objects), and does not stop again before entering the intersection, they might get ticketed.
  • Stopping Too Far Back: While less common, if a driver stops too far behind the stop sign or line and then rolls forward without stopping again, it can be considered a violation.
It's essential to understand that for enforcement, many officers will position their patrol vehicles in locations where they have a clear view of the stop sign and the behavior of motorists. They'll be watching closely to ensure drivers make full stops and adhere to other stop sign rules. If a driver is pulled over for a stop sign violation, the officer will typically ask questions about their understanding of the law and observe their behavior before deciding to issue a ticket.

Is challenging stop sign tickets in Traffic Court in NY worth it?

Challenging a stop sign ticket (or any traffic violation) in New York can be worth it, depending on several factors. Here are some considerations to help you decide:

  • Points on Your License: In New York, a stop sign violation carries a penalty of three points on your license. Accumulating 11 points in an 18-month period can result in a suspension. If you have other violations adding to your point total, challenging the ticket might be crucial.
  • Insurance Premiums: Convictions for traffic violations can lead to increased insurance premiums. Insurance companies see violations as indications of risky behavior, which can lead to higher rates.
  • Fines and Fees: A conviction for a stop sign violation can lead to a fine, and there might also be a surcharge. In some cases, the Driver Responsibility Assessment fee might apply if you accumulate six or more points on your license within 18 months.
  • Possible Reduction: Even if you believe you're guilty, it's possible to have the ticket reduced to a lesser violation or have the penalties reduced. This can be particularly advantageous if you're close to accumulating enough points for a license suspension.
  • Evidence and Witness Accounts: If you have evidence (like dashcam footage) or witness accounts that can support your claim that you did not commit the violation, it would make sense to challenge the ticket.
  • Cost of Legal Representation: Hiring a traffic lawyer can increase your chances of a successful defense, but there's a cost associated with that. You should weigh the potential savings (in terms of fines, fees, and insurance premiums) against the cost of hiring a lawyer.
  • Time and Effort: Going to traffic court requires time. You might have to miss work or other commitments. Consider the value of your time when deciding whether to challenge the ticket.
  • Court Procedures and Errors: Sometimes, there might be procedural errors in how the ticket was issued, or the issuing officer might not appear in court. These factors can work in your favor.
In summary, while it's not guaranteed that challenging a stop sign ticket will result in a dismissal or reduction, there are valid reasons to consider it. It's a personal decision, based on the potential consequences of the ticket and the resources (time, money, effort) you're willing to invest in the challenge. If in doubt, consulting with a traffic lawyer can provide clarity.

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